Policies for competitive smallholder livestock production
4 - 6 March 2015
Lansmore Hotel, Gaborone, Botswana


Objectives

The conference aims to provide an opportunity for African and international scientists and the broader stakeholder groups in the livestock production sector to discuss competitiveness in livestock production systems and improving the livelihoods of livestock farmers and other value chain actors, especially smallholder farmers, with emphasis on Southern Africa.

Specific objectives are to:
  • Discuss competitiveness in agricultural food production and marketing, and to shed light on the factors that influence competitiveness
  • To provide answers to questions and dialogue on key topics related to competitiveness of smallholder livestock, including market access, economics of animal health, role of collective action, government role provision of livestock support services, particularly to tease out policy implications.


Day 1 - Wednesday 4 March 2015
  • 08.00 Registration
  • 08.30 Welcome remarks and introduction of the objectives (Dr. Seleka)
  • 08.40 Introduction of participants and the agenda (MN: participants (20-25') - Agenda + house rules + responsibilities of chairing + focus for questions on policy implications, factors driving competitiveness)
  • 09.15 Theme 1: Measures of competitiveness in smallholder livestock production and policy advocacy (Chair: Dr. Davis Marumo) - ELB
    • Competitiveness of smallholder pig producers in rural Malawi: challenges and prospects for improvement. (Andy Safalaoh / Storytelling)
    • Policy opportunities to enhance the role of smallholder livestock systems in the post-apartheid social reform efforts in the Limpopo province of South Africa (G.T Rootman)
    • Measures of competitiveness in smallholder livestock production and policy advocacy (Bahta & Malope / PPT)
    • 5' buzz around the tables
    • International Competitiveness of Botswana’s Beef Industry (Dr. Seleka)
    • Technical efficiency and technological gaps among smallholder beef farms in Botswana: a stochastic meta-frontier approach. (Bahta, Baker, Malope and Katijuongua)
  • 10.15 Q&A, Coffee & tea break
  • 10.40 Theme 1 (continued) - MN
    • 1' feedback from each presenter of previous session
    • Meat processing and preservation technologies practiced in Kenya’s Pastoral areas with potential for improvement based on product competitiveness. (Josephat N.)
    • Measuring competitiveness of beef and sheep production on national and international level (Claus Deblitz / S. Bahta)
    • Social capital and livestock investments: Evidence from Masaka District, Uganda (Mawejje, J.)
  • 11.25 Q&A (buzz around the table and questions for the presenters) - MN
  • 11.40 Group discussion on theme 1 - MN
    • What are the key policy implications of this work?
    • What are three key indicators of competitiveness (in the livestock sector?)
      • MENTION THAT THE 5' BEFORE WE NEED TO RESET THE ROOM FOR THE WELCOME REMARKS
  • 12.00 Welcome remarks
    • Dr. Seleka, Executive Director – Botswana Institute for Development Policy Analysis (1')
    • Official Opening – Hon. Patrick Ralotsia – Acting Minister of Agriculture (20')
    • Mr. Chris Munn, The Chargé d´Affaires of the Australian High Commission (Pretoria) (5')
    • Dr. Sikhalazo Dube, International Livestock research Institute (ILRI) (5')
  • Group photo
  • 12.40 Lunch break
  • 13.45 Theme 2: Economics of animal health and trade in the competitiveness of smallholder livestock production (Chair: Dr. Hameed Nuru) - ELB
    • Disease prevalence in smallholder livestock production system: a seroprevalenace survey in Botswana (Kawonga, Sergeant, Moagabo, Katjiuongua, Ntsesang & Kootshegetse et al. / PPT)
    • The impact of training using a structured primary animal health care model on the skill of rural small scale farmers. (R. Moerane)
    • Regional Trade Opportunities for Botswana’s Livestock Sector (the small stock and beef sectors) (Maiketso & Motswapong
      • Q&A session Buzz around the table and questions for presenters (15')
      • Feedback from presenters (3')
    • Animal health cost and disease incidence at household level: case of smallholder livestock in Botswana (Katjiuongua, H / Storytelling)
    • Creating networks for improved understanding of the epidemiology and socioeconomic impact of peste des petits ruminants in Southern Africa (Fischer, C. / Storytelling)
    • Comparison of Oestrus Synchronization response and pregnancy rate on village cows following timed artificial insemination in Kwazulu- Natal and Limpopo Provinces (Magashu, A)
    • OIE's role in smallholder livestock production in the SADC region (Letshwenyo)
      • Buzz around the table and questions for experts (15')
    • Feedback from presenters (3')
  • 15.15 Coffee & tea break
  • 15.45 Group work on theme 2 - ELB
    • What are the key policy implications of this work?
    • What’s needed in 'economics of animal health and trade' to improve smallholder livestock competitiveness…?
    • What are the major constraints to delivery of animal health services to smallholder producers?
  • 16.20 Wrap up of day 1 and close (Process: 1-2-4-all to reflect on key points / perhaps putting chairs aside) + time to synthesise (chairs!) the key points from the day - MN
  • ALTERNATIVELY:
    • Move session 4 to this slot...
    • Work out results from theme 1 & 2 and tease out synthesis + mention what this means for the next days' theme...

Day 2 - Thursday 5 March 2015
  • 08.00 Theme 3: Market access, utilisation and food security (Chair: B. Masilo) - MN
    • Key issues in Botswana poultry value chain: the case of Gaborone, Kgatleng, Kweneng and South East districts (Charity Masole)
    • Analysis of marketing performance of the dairy value chain in Tanga city, Tanzania. (Ibrahim A. Wikedzi / Storytelling)
      • 5' buzz
    • Market access and utilization, M-Fodder: innovation from east Africa. (Elvis F Ouma / Storytelling)
    • Unleashing maize-dairy integrated production synergistic potential for smallholder farming (D. Chiumia)
    • Demonstration of dairy technologies in Peri- urban areas of Nekemte, Bako and Gimbi towns, western Oromia, Ethiopia (Abera, H. / PPT)
  • 09.00 Q&A session with buzz on the table and speakers available in parallel
  • 09.15 Theme 3 (continued) - MN
      • Feedback from presenters
    • Feasibility analysis to trade boneless beef from Botswana to the Middle-East: A system dynamics approach (Kanar Hamza / storytelling by Epi)
    • An assessment of the beef cattle marketing in Benue State, Nigeria: Implication for investment in the beef cattle value chain (Abu, G.A. / Storytelling)
    • Market access through one million Regressions: What do Ugandan dairy farmers say? (Pica-Ciamarra / Storytelling)
      • 5' buzz
    • Characterization of Food Security and Consumption Patterns among Livestock Keepers in Botswana (Francis Wanyoike, Sirak Bahta / Storytelling?)
    • Transaction costs and institutional constraints to market participation by smallholder livestock farmers in Kweneng west, Botswana. (Kgosikoma, R.K)
  • 10.15 Coffee & tea break and Q&A
  • 10.45 Feedback from presenters
  • 10.50 Group work and discussion on theme 3 - MN
    • What are the key policy implications of this work?
    • What’s needed in 'market access, utilisation and food security' to improve smallholder livestock competitiveness…?
    • What are the top 3 opportunities to improve the access of smallholder livestock producers to local and regional markets (and why)?
  • 11.20 Theme 4: Role of collective action in enhancing competitiveness in smallholder livestock farmers (Chair: Hikuepi Katjiuongua) - ELB
    • Role of collective action in enhancing the competitiveness of smallholder livestock production in Botswana (Malope, Selelo and Bahta)
    • Role of collective action in enhancing the competitiveness of smallholder livestock production: case of Namibia (Tjimune, V. / Storytelling)
    • Dairy business hubs as collective action in enhancing competitiveness of smallholder dairy farmers in Kenya. (Irungu, R. / PPT)
  • 11.35 Q&A session with buzz on the table and speakers available in parallel - ELB
  • 11.45 Discussion and group work on theme 4
    • What are the key policy implications of these presentations?
    • What’s needed in collective action to improve smallholder livestock competitiveness…?
    • What are the top 3 contributing factors needed to support farmer organisations in their role of improving the competitiveness of smallholder livestock producers?
  • 12.15 Lunch break + synthesis work
  • 13.15 Farmers' reflections on our work
  • 13.25 Theme 5: Governments’ role in the provision of livestock support services (Chair: Dr. Mahabile) - MN
    • Smallholder cattle farmer's access to credit in Swaziland (Mamba, T / Storytelling)
    • Smallholder livestock systems support: experiences from the National biogas program of Ethiopia (Alemayehu, T.)
    • Supporting small ruminant based livelihoods in India: key elements of a pro-poor policy framework. (Mehta / Storytelling)
    • Role of support services in enhancing competitiveness of smallholder livestock farmers (MacLloyd Banda)
      • Buzz around the table
    • An assessment of the Feed Resources in the Beef Production systems of Botswana (Baleseng, L., Makgekgenene A., & Lukuyu, B. / PPT)
    • The Role of Government in the provision of livestock services: An examination of Livestock Advisory Centre (Malope, Mmopelwa and Bahta)
    • Manure mgt. policy (Ethiopia): Manure management policies: a supportive tool for saving the earth and improving livelihoods of smallholder farmers (Ndambi, A.)
  • 14.55 Q&A session with buzz on the table and speakers available in parallel - MN
  • 15.10 Discussion and group work on theme 5 - MN
    • What are the key policy implications of these presentations?
    • What’s needed in collective action to improve smallholder livestock competitiveness…?
    • What are the top 3 things the government can do to improve the competitiveness of smallholder producers?
  • 15.35 Coffee break
  • 16.00 Wrap up day two - ELB?
    • 15' Look back at synthesis sheets for all themes (by theme 1, theme 2 team, Mike, Sirak, Epi)
    • 60' And prioritise synthesis points: 3 / theme. World café: (Muthoni / Nadheem / Nuru / Ferran / Letsema / Mehta or BCA)
      • How scaleable are interventions that they have talked about?
      • What are the capacity development implications of the 3 interventions (that you discussed previously)?
      • What is the effect of these three interventions on households (gender, youth, labour)?
    • 5' Close
  • 17.15 (5') Overall synthesis and close (Mike Nunn)













Scenario 1 - business as planned, only slightly adapted

  • 10.30 presentation 1 (for a max. of 8' + 2' of setting up and out)
  • 10.40 presentation 2 (ditto)
  • 10.50 presentation 3 (ditto)
  • 11.00 presentation 4 (ditto)
  • 11.10 Buzz around the table (people discuss in groups of 2-3 for 3') and plenary Q&A (7')
  • 11.20 presentation 5
  • 11.30 presentation 6
  • 11.40 presentation 7
  • 11.50 Buzz and plenary Q&A (10')
  • 12.00 Group work: refined research questions or sthg around 'key emerging pointers and gaps/next research questions'
  • 12.30 Lunch break

... and on to next section



Scenario 2 - Business almost as usual but no Powerpoint

  • 10.30 Start a bus stop (all presenters around at a different corner and presenting without Powerpoint for 5' + 5' of Q&A for each presentation Non-presenters move in group from presentation to presentation. For this round this means 70' are spent on presentations and Q&A)...
  • 11.45 Group world cafe discussion around 3 key questions that need to be identified
    • OR: (15') quickly mapping key drivers and key research gaps and discussing these in parallel working groups (30') with a report that is not shared in plenary but in a board / piece that can be used for the final synthesis session.
  • 12.30 Lunch break

And again later for other rounds



Scenario 3 - Working on sections in parallel

All sections work together at the same time - this is probably difficult given the possible lack of break-out rooms - but still possible as storytelling circles (or any other work form without Powerpoint) going through the presentations of each section without a video projector...



Probably it is possible to have different formats for different 'sections' to alternate the info sharing/learning styles (to keep participants on their toes).



Scenario 4 - Business almost as usual, but much more interactive and with mixed methods (that keep everyone on their toes)

  • 10.30 parallel presentations 1 & 2 (for a max. of 7-10') including buzz while the next presenters come set things up
  • 10.45 parallel presentations 3 & 4 (ditto)
  • 11.00 parallel presentations 5 & 6 (ditto)
  • 11.15 presentation 7 (ditto)
  • 11.25 Q&A in all corners (go see your resource person)
  • 11.45 Buzz around the table (people discuss in groups of 2-3 for 5') and plenary Q&A (10')
  • 11.45 Group work:
    • World cafe discussion around 3 key questions (that need to be identified)





    • OR: (15') quickly mapping key drivers and key research gaps and discussing these in parallel working groups (30') with a report that is not shared in plenary but in a board / piece that can be used for the final synthesis session.
  • 12.30 Lunch break
  • 13.30 Section 2: Measures of competitiveness in smallholder livestock production and policy advocacy
    • (75') Bus stops: 5x15' to explain the five presentations and participants are going around and hopefully ask questions... (use breaks for additional questions if need be)
  • 14.45 Coffee/tea break
  • 15.15 (75') Bus stops: 5x15' to explain the five presentations and participants are going around and hopefully ask questions... (use breaks for additional questions if need be)
  • 16.30 Group work: World cafe or mapping or otherwise
  • 17.15 Wrap up day one
  • 18.30 Get together and dinner at Lansmore Hotel



Day 2 - Thursday 5 March 2015


  • 08.00 Section 3: Market access, utilisation and food security
    • Marketplace with an elevator pitch: every speaker has 1' to explain what their presentation is about and they go around the room with a flipchart sheet. We organise 6 rounds of 20' for people to choose where they go, listen to a presentation and ask questions, then at next round they go somewhere else etc.
  • 10.00 Break
  • 10.30 Group work (to be defined)
  • 11.15 Section 4 Role of collective action in enhancing competitiveness in smallholder livestock farmers
    • 11.15 Two parallel presentations of 10'
    • 11.30 Two parallel presentations of 10'
    • 11.45 Q&A with speakers around the room
  • 12.00 Group work: to be defined
  • 12.30 Lunch break
  • 13.30 Section 5:
    • Poster / gallery tour session with visuals mostly
  • 14.30 Group work: to be discussed
  • 15.10 Coffee/tea break (shorter because it's the last one and people would rather finish earlier than have longer breaks is my hunch)
  • 15.30 Overall synthesis and discussion - Revisiting the results of each section. Options for that last session:
    • Final world cafe with questions like: a) What are the bigger lessons we have gathered from this. b) How to integrate the different ideas that have come up? c) What seem to be the top priorities for the next phase or 'what does this mean for competitive policies in Botswana/Southern Africa'?
    • Open discussion based on the key pointers that have been put forward to bring together a collage of the big picture and deciding what should be the next priority research areas / activities etc.
    • Samoan Circle where people can discuss the main learning issues they've picked up
    • Open Space about what they want to work on or discuss further
    • A commitment exercise with personal and institutional parts if need be
  • 16.30 Closing remarks (MoA Botswana)